Annual Instruction Swap

Program Description

The NELIG Winter Meeting is traditionally a chance to put theory into practice -- we spend a morning or afternoon sharing some of the ways we have translated what we know (and are learning) about college students &  information literacy into our one-shot classroom visits.

Date and Locations

Friday, December 1, 2017 at 3 locations:

  • Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (9:00 a.m. - noon)
  • Simmons College, Boston, MA (1:00 -4:00 p.m.)
  • Central Connecticut State University, New Britain, CT (9:00 a.m. - noon)

Site Details and Program Information

Dartmouth College

Simmons College

Central Connecticut State University
 


 

Dartmouth College

Directions & Parking

Directions to Berry Library

Park on the street for a fee (2-hour metered parking from 9-5) or in the Dewey Field Lot for free (10 minute walk from Berry Library).  If parking in Dewey Field Lot, call Parking & Transportation Services to let them know you’re at an event at Berry Library and to give them the make, model, and plate # of your vehicle: (603) 646-2204.

Event location: Carson 61 (library map)

Presenters

Tom Hemstock (UNH Law)  Determining if Cases are Mandatory or Persuasive Legal Authority

Lesson Overview:

After a brief introduction students will use maps of the United States federal court system to determine if a case (i.e. a card representing Smith v. Jones + citation) is binding authority in a given jurisdiction. Since this is not an absolute answer, students often grapple with how one case could be binding (mandatory) in one federal circuit yet only persuasive in another.

Learning Outcomes:

Students will use color printed maps to work together to visually determine when a case is binding on a court and students will see that this principle is relative to both the court and where one is located.  

Megan Bresnahan and Eugenia Liu (UNH) Diet Fads, health news, and pseudoscience: Evaluating evidence with low-stakes, informal poster presentations

Lesson Overview:

The Life Sciences and Agriculture Librarian and the Health and Human Services Librarian at the University of New Hampshire collaborated to transform the traditionally lecture-based library session for Dietetics Interns enrolled in the Department of Agriculture, Nutrition, and Food Science. The workshop was designed as a team-based, active-learning session. Students collaborated to critically evaluate the claims made in a health-related news article and synthesize evidence about their resulting research question. To share their process, each team designed a low-stakes, informal poster summarizing their findings and presented their conclusions about the diet fad or sensational health claim to their peers.  

Learning Outcomes:

By the end of the embedded librarian instruction series, students should be able to:

Generate appropriate and answerable research questions or topics related to the field of health policy

Compare a variety of government and library resources to find relevant statistics to use as evidence to inform or support their research

Use information and images from the web ethically

Distinguish from a variety of information types and select appropriate forms of information to use for their research

Clearly articulate information in a visual format

Benjamin Peck & Eugenia Liu (UNH)  Infographics and InfoLit: Collaborative, Active-Learning in an Embedded Course

Lesson Overview:

The Health and Human Services Librarian and the First Year Instruction Librarian collaborated with the chair of Health Management and Policy to identify areas to embed information literacy and library sessions throughout the course curriculum. The librarians led several library sessions over the course of the semester to support students with developing a health policy infographic for their final final project.

Learning Outcomes:

After the session, students will be able to:

- Recognize the importance of critically evaluating nutrition information in the news or online

- Identify interdisciplinary information sources appropriate for both nutrition practitioners and consumers

- Develop appropriate search strategies for a research topic

- Synthesize information about a topic from multiple sources and explain it to peers

Laura Braunstein (Dartmouth) Introduction to Text Encoding: A Digital Humanities Assignment

Lesson Overview:

Transcribe and encode an 18th-century manuscript document using simplified markup.

Learning Outcomes:

Attendees will understand transcription and encoding as intellectual processes; attendees will learn basic conceptions in the digital humanities; attendees will learn how libraries make material in special collections available to wider audiences through digitization.
 

Simmons College

Directions & Parking

Directions to Simmons College

If you plan to drive, you can park in the garage for a discounted rate (see rates below).  You can enter the garage from either Avenue Louis Pasteur or Palace Road.  Pull a ticket when you enter the garage, and you'll receive a validated pass before you leave the program.  You'll need to enter your original ticket and the validated pass to exit, and you can pay the discounted rate with a debit or credit card on your way out.

  • 0-2 hours $6.75
  • 2-4 hours $10.00
  • 4-5 hours $13.50
  • Over 5 hours $18.00

Event location: Beatley Library (located in Lefavour Hall), room L-225 (campus map)

Presenters

Dominique Barrault (Emmanuel) All In Scavenger Hunt

Lesson Overview:

The class begins with a short tour of the library using the Cephalonian method. After the tour the students meet in the library instruction room. At this time I briefly introduce them to the library website and Emmanuel's  "All In" discovery platform. The students then complete a "scavenger hunt" through which they refine a given search topic, employing varying search techniques and identify various types of resources. They complete the scavenger hunt by emailing themselves a folder of saved resources through the discovery platform. The last twenty minutes of class is spent reviewing the activity as a group. Before the students leave they are asked to complete a very short assessment via a Google form saved to the desktop.

Learning Outcomes:

During the workshop students learn how to navigate the discovery platform to locate general information sources related to a specific topic. Students also discover various resources and formats and the difference between popular, and scholarly sources. Students employ multiple search strategies to refine a  research topic.  Finally, in the discussion we address the importance of proper evaluation and citation of resources.

Amy Barlow (RIC) The One: 90 minutes dedicated to the art of finding and examining one scholarly article

Lesson Overview:

Students in a 300-level Art History class are required to find one scholarly article for their virtual research portfolios. During a 90 minute library workshop, students will engage in 3 activities: 1. A process for understanding how scholars communicate; 2. A simple performance comparison of two databases (Art & Architecture Complete and JSTOR); and 3. A search for one scholarly article that meets the criteria of their assignment.

Learning Outcomes:

1. Students examine a scholarly article in Art History; Students strategize about how they can use a scholarly article to search for additional relevant sources.

2. Students differentiate between article and journal titles; Students explore the focused content of an academic journal; Students consider possible audiences for the journal.

3. Students gather contextual information about the journal, including its university press, professional association, and publishing schedule; Students learn about refereed and peer-review processes.

Eric Shannon and Leslie Inglis (Franklin Pierce University) The Credibility Continuum

Lesson Overview:

This session is a collaboration between librarians and faculty members teaching in the First Year Inquiry program.  Librarians provide faculty members with a group of sources including pieces of physical materials from the library as well as URLs. Librarians also work with faculty members to create a set of questions that they can pose to students to help them think critically about the sources. In class, students are asked to identify the sources using the credibility continuum, a LibGuide created by Franklin Pierce University Librarians, and the CRAAP test. The goal of this activity is to provide students with a hands on session evaluating the credibility of different sources of information.

Learning Outcomes:

The primary learning outcome is evaluation of information sources. The goal is to get students in the habit of critically evaluating the information sources that they are likely to encounter throughout their academic careers and beyond. We find that students are adept at using limiters in the databases to identify scholarly or popular articles, but when confronted with the sources themselves without the help of the databases, they struggle.

Phil Waterman (Assumption College) Introduction to the Research Process

Lesson Overview:

This session is designed to acquaint students with the steps involved in the research process and give them the opportunity to practice some of those steps, specifically, developing a focused research topic, developing keywords and synonyms for their topic, and searching for and evaluating relevant sources.

Learning Outcomes:

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to develop topic-related vocabulary in order to search databases with maximum flexibility and effectiveness; and students will be able to use an effective search strategy in order to identify and select appropriate resources for their research project.
 

Central Connecticut State University

Directions & Parking

Directions to CCSU

Parking: Follow the directions to the Student Center Parking Lot and Garage and the Welte Parking Lot.  All of these parking options are free to visitors.

Event location: Elihu Burritt Library, room 205

Presenters

Briana McGuckin(CCSU) The "Woke" One-Shot: Engaging and Empowering Students in 60 Minutes or Less

Lesson Overview:

This is a traditional lecture with a lot of questions mixed in; students will be called upon to answer these. In full lessons, I end with a computer activity. There will not be time to complete this, but I will provide the hand-out.

Learning Outcomes:

Students leave the session able to: understand the goal behind using databases in a Google-driven world, find and search appropriate databases, identify promising search terms, narrow a topic to an appropriate scope while searching, relate both subject terms and academic journal article format to past experience, retrieve materials full-text or through inter-library loan, and retrieve a working citation from a database.

Kyle Lynes (University of Hartford) Intro to Types of Information and Database Searching

Lesson Overview:

This lesson is designed for a 50 minute one-shot session. It combines lecturettes and short activities to keep students engaged.

1. As students arrive, they are asked to look at the projected slide containing a pair of boots (no context given). They are then asked to attempt to find these boots online to buy. After 7-10 minutes, we talk about their search process (keywords used, revision of search, etc.). I then relate it to exploratory searching in the databases (vague topic, getting started).

2. They are given an overview of the information timeline (types of sources, timeliness/reliability of sources, peer review process, application of sources).

3. In small groups, students are given an event with a stack of sources. They are asked to put the sources in order, based on the timeline (not pub. date), and present to the class.

4. Next, students are given an overview of the library website and shown how to access databases. We cover Academic Search Premier (multidisciplinary) and ProQuest Social Science (subject). There is a demo search in Academic Search Premier (lightly touch upon database features, keyword selection, search technique, Boolean). ProQuest Social Science is briefly shown.

5. Students are asked to use the remaining time to search for information on their own topics in the databases. The professor and I walk around to answer individual questions.

6. A five minute assessment is completed.

Learning Outcomes:

Students learn:

-How to differentiate between source types

-How to use types of sources in a research paper

-How to perform an advanced search in a library database

-How to obtain information from an academic database

Nicole Rioux (CCSU) Introduction to Citing Sources

Lesson Overview:

Students will examine a short scholarly article and take note of where and how citations are used. Students will then complete a short exercise to follow the path of a citation from an in-text citation, to the full reference, to locating the second article in library databases. Following the exercise and discussion will be a short overview of the format for common sources types in a specific citation style.

Learning Outcomes:

Students will learn how to follow citations in sources they've found to additional research.

Students will start to understand why it is important to properly cite materials in their own papers.

Students will be introduced to some common source citation formats in a particular style.

Todd Hampton (Gateway Community College) Information Literacy Pre and Postes Using LibGuides

Lesson Overview:

Information Literacy Librarian Todd Hampton will give a demonstration of Gateway Community College's Information Literacy Pre & Post Test.

Learning Outcomes:

• Demonstrate competency in using current, relevant technologies to solve problems, complete projects, and make informed decisions

• Access, navigate, identify and evaluate information that is appropriate for their need(s) and audience(s)

• Synthesize information to broaden knowledge and experiences and produce both independent and collaborative work